How to Prevent Tennis Elbow from Returning

If you have overstretched the tendons in your forearm, you know how painful and annoying it can be. This condition is known as lateral epicondylitis, aka “tennis elbow.”

It can be prevented by doing some simple stretches daily, especially before activities that cause you tennis elbow pain, as well as by icing the area after exercise.

And of course, you can reduce the pain by avoiding or cutting down on activities that require repetitive movements, like typing or playing tennis or golf.

Here are several things you can do to help prevent another case of tennis elbow.

Stretch your arms and wrists

Once your swelling has subsided or reduced, you will be ready to start the process of getting your forearm back to its original, flexible, healthy self.

You can do this by simply performing a series of daily stretches:

Elbow bends

Stand straight, hands at your side, then bend your arm at your elbow till your hand meets your shoulder. Hold for 30 seconds, then lower your arm.

Wrist extending and flexing

Stretch your arm out in front of you, palm down. Now use your other hand to pull back on your extended fingertips and letting your wrist bend. You’ll feel the stretch in your extended wrist. Hold for 15 to 20 seconds and release.

You can reverse this by pushing your fingertips down while letting your wrist bend. Hold again for up to 20 seconds. Do this exercise for five reps, four times a day.

Fist squeezes

For this one, you’ll have to dig through the closet and find a sock, stress ball, dish towel, or tennis ball. Really, anything that you can hold in your fist that has a little bit of give to it will work.

Extend your arm, holding the object in your hand, then squeeze. Hold this for 10 seconds then release. Repeat this nine times.

You can use these stretching exercises even after your forearm becomes inflamed from tennis elbow to help your muscles heal and to curb the pain.

Apply ice after exercising

This is one of the oldest tricks of the trade. By applying ice to the stretched tendon of your forearm after doing exercises like lifting weights, you can reduce the amount of swelling or inflammation of the tennis elbow area.

When it’s time to go to the doctor

Of course, stretches and ice packs can help you tremendously, but if you’re feeling constant pain, it’s time to consult Dr. Wade McKenna to see if there are other options for relieving the pain of tennis elbow.

At McKenna Orthopedics & Biologics, our friendly staff members are happy to answer any questions you may have regarding tennis elbow, tendon swelling, or physical therapy in general.

The road to recovery from injuries like tennis elbow doesn’t have to be a road you navigate alone! Give us a call or request an appointment online today!

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